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In the past months I’ve had a recurrent conversation with many people. This conversation is typically started with the question: why do you like living where you live? Some of them might be considering moving to the city I live in for work, some of them are thinking about leaving, some are happy here. Ultimately, everyone is different and what makes some happy might not be for the rest. Some friends want to live in larger cities, others want different climates, others want to move in with their long distance relationship partners, etc.

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This week the owner of my favorite Mexican restaurant in Baltimore, Rosalyn Vera, got death and arson1 threats. I could have been a bystander, but I tapped into my network and asked for help and she has received it. It’s been great to see the power of the community in action. The backstory So, I use R and Bioconductor for work and I get to witness the warmth and mostly friendly #rstats community where daily people ask for help and get it.

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Recently I’ve been thinking on the subject of asking for help. In short, it’s hard to ask for help. It involves admitting to yourself that you can’t solve the problem alone, opening yourself up, hoping that another person will understand you and guide you in the right direction. Thus it can be painful if your request for help is misunderstood, met with criticism or ignored. Regardless of these obstacles, I think that the potential rewards make it worth it.

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I can’t tell you how many times I’ve started to write this post in my mind since May 2018. Today I’m finally typing it on the computer. This will be a rather long post that ties in several threads. I’ll talk about Cold Spring Harbor’s Biology of Genomes conference and its relationship to my undergrad in Mexico. I’ll also introduce you to Aldo Barrientos (1987-2011) who was was my undergrad classmate.

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I recently wrote several blog posts with many tweets1 as a way of taking notes during the American Society of Human Genetics 2018 conference. A few friends asked me how I did this so fast. The process can be summarized into the following main steps. Save links of tweets you want to highlight in your post. Use a hugo-powered blog to obtain the code for embedding tweets easily2. Proofread, edit and post.

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Continuing from my ASHG18 day 1 post, day 2, day 3 and day4 here’s my list of tweets from day 5. 6C 9:15 am Jane Loveland Wish that gene annotation was consistent across databases? Jane Loveland is speaking about the new #MANE project which aims to converge transcript annotation between @GencodeGenes and @NCBI RefSeq in 30 min 09:15-09:30, Room 6C, Talk 302 #ASHG18 — Ensembl (@ensembl) October 20, 2018 Jane Loveland: there are two comprehensive transcript annotations, RefSeq and Gencode.

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Continuing from my ASHG18 day 1 post, day 2, day 3 here’s my list of tweets from day 4. 6F 11:00 am Cecilia Lingdren Got there at the end :P Had #diversitymatters and many flags including the rainbow one in her last slide. Benjamin Neale .@bmneale points out dimorphism in research participation - women more likely to participate (generally and in UK Biobank) and yet comparatively understudied #ASHG18

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Continuing from my ASHG18 day 1 post and day 2, here’s my list of tweets from day 3. 9:15 20BC Jenna Carlson Jenna Carlson @PittPubHealth: Population-specific reference panels for genotype imputation, with Samoans as an example, in Room 20BC #ASHG18 — Kevin L. Keys (@_klkeys_) October 18, 2018 Jenna Carlson: creating population-specific reference panels for improved genotype imputation #ASHG18 — Charleston Chiang (@CharlestonCWKC) October 18, 2018 JC: Genotype chips cheap, useful for global health research.

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Continuing from my ASHG18 day 1 post, here’s my list of tweets from day 2. Note that I changed sessions a few times. I have to say, digitally attending #ASHG18 by frantically refreshing the hashtag feed in my living room is...not quite the same. But maybe I'll get fish tacos for dinner. — Julie Nadel (@JulieNadel) October 17, 2018 Turn down the lights and turn up the AC for the fuller remote #ASHG18 experience!

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Today was the first day of the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 conference. The official hashtag for the conference is ASHG18 on Twitter. At first I was tweeting myself and checking both the top and the latest tweets. As the day progressed I started a Google Doc to take notes during talks. I was missing some details so I was relying on the latest tweets and copy-pasting the tweet links to my notes.

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